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Your Best Guide to Intermediate-Level Afrikaans Phrases

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So, you’ve decided not to remain a beginner student of Afrikaans—that’s great! Welcome to the intermediate level of this fascinating language, where things are going to get a bit more nuanced and complex. Don’t fear, though; it’s not terribly difficult to master. Consider taking this opportunity to learn some of the most important intermediate Afrikaans words and phrases—easy peasy!


Partygoers Wearing Costumes and Animal Masks.

Ons het gisteraand se partytjie baie geniet. (“We really enjoyed last night’s party.”)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Afrikaans Table of Contents
  1. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Talking About Past Events
  2. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Making and Changing Plans
  3. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Explaining and Listing Reasons
  4. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Making Complaints, Remarks, and Recommendations
  5. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Reaction Phrases for Everyday Conversations
  6. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Etiquette Phrases for Social and Business Settings
  7. Learn the best intermediate Afrikaans phrases for all occasions at AfrikaansPod101.com!

1. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Talking About Past Events

Imagine this scenario: You’re with your Afrikaans-speaking friends at a small dinner party, your favorite beverage in hand, and you’re feeling relaxed. You want to contribute to the conversation and also show off your brand-new Afrikaans skills a bit. 

Go for it! Wow your friends by asking them questions about their day or telling them about interesting past events with these easy intermediate Afrikaans phrases.


AFRIKAANSENGLISH
Hoe het dit met jou eksamen gegaan?Meaning: “How did your exam go?”
Literally: How has it with your exam went?
Hoe was werk gewees vandag?Meaning: “How has work been today?”
Literally: How was work been today?
Vertel my van laasjaar se vakansie in Peru?Meaning: “Tell me about last year’s holiday in Peru?”
Literally: Tell me of last year’s holiday in Peru?
Ek is gister bevorder by die werk.

Note: The Afrikaans word for “work” and “job” are the same: werk. The use of an article (‘n / die – “a” / “the”) will indicate which one you’re talking about.
Meaning: “I got a promotion at work yesterday.”
Literally: I is yesterday promote at the work.
Ek het vier jaar terug daar begin werk.Meaning: “I started working there four years ago.”
Literally: I have four years ago there start work.
Hulle het gaan inkopies doen.Meaning: “They went shopping.”
Literally: They have go shopping done.
Ons het in die berg gaan stap; dit was heerlik gewees.Meaning: “We went hiking in the mountains; it was very enjoyable.”
Literally: We have in the mountain go hike; it was very enjoyable has been.

Note: Heerlik means both “delicious” and “very pleasant.”
Almal het Saterdag strand toe gegaan.Meaning: “Everybody went to the beach on Saturday.”
Literally: Everybody has Saturday beach to went.
Ek het Taalkunde by Oxford Universiteit gestudeer.Meaning: “I studied Linguistics at Oxford University.”
Literally: I have Linguistics by Oxford University studied.
My seun is in Bloemfontein gebore.Meaning: “My son was born in Bloemfontein.”
Literally: My son is in Bloemfontein born.
Ons het gisteraand se partytjie baie geniet.Meaning: “We really enjoyed last night’s party.”
Literally: We have last night’s party really enjoyed.
Die ete was heerlik gewees!Meaning: “The meal was delicious!”
Literally: The meal was delicious has been!
Daardie was die ergste dag van my lewe gewees.Meaning: “That was the worst day of my life.”
Literally: That was the worst day of my life has been.
Ek het ‘n kat met die naam van Pantouf gehad.Meaning: “I used to have a cat called Pantouf.”
Literally: I had a cat with the name of Pantouf have had.

A Sitting Black-and-White Cat.

Ek het ‘n kat met die naam van Pantouf gehad. (“I used to have a cat called Pantouf.”)

2. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Making and Changing Plans

Great, you’re an active part of the conversation! Of course, your friends are very impressed by your Afrikaans speaking skills, and they definitely want to see more of you. Now, you’ll have to be ready to make plans to meet up. And for this, you’ll need some good intermediate Afrikaans words and phrases at the ready. 

But life happens, and sometimes one can’t stick to plans or keep prior commitments. In that case, you’ll have to negotiate other terms—we’ve got you covered there, too!


AFRIKAANSENGLISH
Wat gaan jy hierdie naweek doen?Meaning: “What are you going to do this weekend?”
Literally: What will you this weekend do?
Wat van Afrikaanse kos?Meaning: “How about Afrikaans food?”
Literally: What about Afrikaans food?
Het jy hierdie naweek tyd?Meaning: “Do you have time this weekend?”
Literally: Have you this weekend time?
Mag ek my kêrel / meisie / metgesel saambring?Meaning: “May I bring my boyfriend / girlfriend / partner with me?”
Literally: May I my boyfriend / girlfriend / partner with-bring?
Jammer, maar ek is besig hierdie naweek.Meaning: “Sorry, but I’m busy this weekend.”
Literally: Sorry, but I is busy this weekend.
Kan ons dit uitstel tot volgende week, asseblief?Meaning: “Could we postpone it till next week, please?”
Literally: Can we it postpone till next week, please?
Watter tyd sal jou die beste pas?Meaning: “Which time will suit you best?”
Literally: Which time shall you the best suit?
Hoe laat moet ek daar wees?Meaning: “What time should I be there?”
Literally: How late must I there be?
Kom ons reël ‘n Zoom afspraak vir volgende week om besonderhede te bespreek.Meaning: “Let us arrange a Zoom meeting for next week to discuss details.”
Literally: Let us arrange a Zoom meeting for next week to details to discuss.
Ek wonder of ons ‘n ander afspraak kan maak?Meaning: “I wonder if we could reschedule?”
Literally: I wonder if we a different appointment could make?
Kom ons bespreek dit later.Meaning: “Let’s discuss it later.”
Literally: Come us discuss it later.
Wat van ‘n Italiaanse restaurant vanaand?Meaning: “How about an Italian restaurant tonight?”
Literally: What of an Italian restaurant tonight?
Sal jy die partytjie kan bywoon?Meaning: “Will you be able to attend the party?”
Literally: Will you the party can attend?
Ek is nie beskikbaar Maandag nie.Meaning: “I’m not available Monday.”
Literally: I am not available Monday not.
Kom saam met ons!Meaning: “Come with us!”
Literally: Come together with us!

Italian Food.

Wat van ‘n Italiaanse restaurant vanaand? (“How about an Italian restaurant tonight?”)

3. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Explaining and Listing Reasons

When you have to change plans, you sometimes have to give a reason for doing so. Or, when discussing different topics during a conversation, your friends might want to hear your opinion on something. Impress everybody with these useful intermediate Afrikaans phrases!


AFRIKAANSENGLISH
Ek moet ongelukkig kanselleer want ek is siek.Meaning: “Unfortunately, I have to cancel because I’m unwell.”
Literally: I must unfortunately cancel because I is ill.
Ek kon nie aanlyn werk nie want ons dorp se elektrisiteit was af.Meaning: “I couldn’t work online because our town’s electricity was down.”
Literally: I could not online work not because our town’s electricity was off.
Ek glo jy doen die regte ding. Dis hoekom ek jou ondersteun.Meaning: “I believe you’re doing the right thing. That’s why I’m supporting you.”
Literally: I believe you do the right thing. That’s why I you support.
Ek verkies hierdie tipe van motor vir drie redes. Eerstens, dis ekonomies en betroubaar.
Tweedens, dis ‘n goeie prys. Laaste maar nie die minste nie—dis maklik om te onderhou.
Meaning: “I prefer this type of car for three reasons. Firstly, it’s economical and reliable. Secondly, it’s a good price. Last but not least—it’s easy to maintain.”
Literally: I prefer this type of motor for three reasons. Firstly, it’s economic and reliable. Secondly, it’s a good price. Lastly but not the least—it’s easy around to maintain.
So jammer, maar my suster het my hulp nodig gehad. Daarom kon ek nie die vergadering bywoon nie.Meaning: “So sorry, but my sister needed my help. Therefore, I couldn’t attend the meeting.”
Literally: So sorry, but my sister has my help need had. Therefore could I not the meeting attend not.
Ek loop vinnig sodat ek by die groep kan hou.Meaning: “I’m walking fast to stay with the group.”
Literally: I walk fast so that I with the group can keep.
Die rede waarom ek daar wil werk is omdat die maatskappy goed betaal, en omdat hulle hul personeel goed behandel.Meaning: “The reason I’d like to work there is because the company pays well, and they treat their employees well.”
Literally: The reason why I there will work is because the company good pays, and because they their employees good treat.

4. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Making Complaints, Remarks, and Recommendations

People rely on other people to recommend or reject products, places, and services. So anytime we make a complaint or recommendation, we’re helping one another make good choices!


A Gourmet Chocolate Dessert with Raspberries and Green Garnish.

Jy moet hierdie restaurant se sjokolade nagereg proe. Dis die beste wat ek nog ooit gehad het! (“You should try this restaurant’s chocolate dessert. It’s the best I’ve ever had!”)

AFRIKAANSENGLISH
Probeer die koue Kolombiaanse koffie, dis heerlik!Meaning: “Try the cold brew Colombian coffee; it’s very tasty!”
Literally: Try the cold Colombian coffee, it’s very tasty!
Jy moet hierdie restaurant se sjokolade nagereg proe. Dis die beste wat ek nog ooit gehad het!Meaning: “You should try this restaurant’s chocolate dessert. It’s the best I’ve ever had!”
Literally: You must this restaurant’s chocolate dessert taste. It’s the best what I since ever had has.
Ek kan die Uithoek Vakansieoord aanbeveel. Ons het ons vakansie daar baie geniet.Meaning: “I can recommend the Uithoek Holiday Resort. We enjoyed our holiday there a lot.”
Literally: I can the Uithoek Holiday Resort recommend. We have our holiday there lots enjoy.
Probeer dit gerus. Ek dink jy sal dit geniet!Meaning: “You’re welcome to try it. I think you’ll enjoy it!”
Literally: Try it at ease. I think you shall it enjoy!

Note: Gerus means “with confidence and peace of mind.” I don’t think there’s a single-word equivalent in English, but it’s somewhat similar to “freely” in the phrase “Ask freely.”
Daardie plek se diens is uitstekend!Meaning: “That place’s service is excellent!”
Jammer maar die diens was uiters swak. Ek wil met die bestuurder praat, asseblief.Meaning: “Sorry to say, but the service was extremely poor. I would like to speak to the manager, please.”
Literally: Sorry, but the service was extremely poor. I will with the manager talk, please.
Hierdie botter is oud. Kan ek vars botter kry, asseblief?Meaning: “This butter is stale. May I have some fresh butter, please?”
Literally: This butter is old. Can I fresh butter get, please?
Swak diens. Kan nie die winkel aanbeveel nie.Meaning: “Poor service. Can’t recommend the shop.”
Literally: Poor service. Can not the shop recommend not.
Hulle nasorg-diens is uitstekend.Meaning: “Their after-care service is excellent.”

    ➜ Feeling intimidated regarding the use of these intermediate Afrikaans words and phrases in a conversation? Don’t worry, that’s normal! We recommend you watch this short AfrikaansPod101 video to learn some wonderful tips on how to break through any resistance you feel when it comes to speaking Afrikaans (or any other language)!

5. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Reaction Phrases for Everyday Conversations

Once you’ve mastered all of the previous Afrikaans phrases for intermediate students, you’ll have to be ready for when you’re on the receiving end. Here’s how to respond!

A Smiling Young Woman Showing the Thumbs-up Gesture.

Uitstekende voorstel, kom ons doen dit. (“Excellent suggestion. Let’s do it.”)

AFRIKAANSENGLISH
Ek sal dit beslis probeer.Meaning: “I will definitely try it.”
Literally: I shall it definitely try.
Ek ken dit en ja, dis heerlik.Meaning: “I know it, and yes, it’s delicious.”
O nee, dis nie vir my nie! Ek hou nie daarvan nie.Meaning: “Oh no, that’s not for me! I don’t like it.”
Literally: Oh no, that’s not for me not! I like not there-from not.
Dis fantastiese nuus! Ek is bly vir jou.Meaning: “That’s fantastic news! I’m happy for you.”
Literally: That’s fantastic news! I is happy for you.
Dankie dat jy my vroegtydig sê.Meaning: “Thank you for letting me know in advance.”
Literally: Thank you that you me early-timely say.
Uitstekende voorstel, kom ons doen dit.Meaning: “Excellent suggestion. Let’s do it.”
Literally: Excellent suggestion, come we do it.
Ek het ook lus daarvoor!Meaning: “I also feel like having that!”
Literally: I have also desire there-front!
Ek is jammer om dit te hoor. Hoop jy voel gou beter.Meaning: “I’m sorry to hear that. Hope you feel better soon.”
Literally: I is sorry to it to hear. Hope you feel soon better.
Fantasies! Ek’s bly jy kan kom.Meaning: “Fantastic! I’m glad you can make it.”
Literally: Fantastic! I’s happy you can come.
Jammer jy kon nie daar wees nie.Meaning: “Sorry you couldn’t be there.”
Literally: Sorry you could not there be not.
Dankie vir die aanbeveling / raad / waarskuwing.Meaning: “Thanks for the recommendation / advice / warning.”
Dis goed om te weet, dankie. Ek sal dit in gedagte hou.Meaning: “That’s good to know, thanks. I will keep it in mind.”
Literally: It’s good around to know, thanks. I shall it in thought keep.
Dis indrukwekkend / ongelooflik / fantasies / ‘n jammerte.Meaning: “That’s impressive / unbelievable / fantastic / a pity.”
Ag wel, dis ‘n jammerte, maar dit kan nie verhelp word nie.Meaning: “Ah well, that’s a pity, but it can’t be helped.”
Literally: Ah well, that’s a sorry-ness, but it can not helped be not.
Moenie bekommerd wees nie, ek verstaan.Meaning: “Don’t worry; I understand.”
Literally: Don’t worried be not, I understand.
Ek sien wat jy bedoel en ek stem saam.Meaning: “I see what you mean, and I agree.”
Literally: I see what you mean and I vote together.
Ek voel ook so!Meaning: “I feel the same!”
Literally: I feel also so!
Jammer vir die ongerief; ek sal dit gou regstel / regmaak.Meaning: “Sorry for the inconvenience; I’ll quickly fix it.”
Literally: Sorry for the inconvenience; I shall it quick right-set / fix.
My ervaring was anders gewees.Meaning: “My experience was different.”
Literally: My experience was different has been.
TUSSENVOEGSELS / INTERJECTIONS
Sjoe!Wow! / Phew!
Rerig? / Werklik?Really? / Truly?
Baie geluk!Congratulations!
Wraggies, nê?!Meaning: “Who’d have thought, hey?!” / “Impressive, hey?!”

Note: The word wraggies has no direct English translation or equivalent. The phrase is close but not entirely similar in meaning to “Really, hey?”
Fantasties!Fantastic! / Awesome!
Jy speel seker…!Meaning: “You’re joking!”
Literally: You play probably…!
Haai?!Literally: Shark?!

Note: I don’t think this interjection has an equivalent in English. It’s close in meaning to the Yiddish exclamation of dismay and upset “Oy!” It’s used as an expression of surprise or incredulity, especially when you think something is shocking, inappropriate, or naughty. It’s characterized by a rising intonation at the end of the word, like when you’re asking a question.
Askies. / Skiestog.

Note: These are informal and semi-informal homophonic interjections.
” ‘scuse me.”
Verskoon my.

Note: This is the formal version of the previous interjections.
Meaning: “Excuse me.” / “Pardon me.”
Literally: Ver-clean me.
Example Dialogue:

A: Ek is gister bevorder by die werk.
B: Wraggies, nê? Baie geluk! Dis fantastiese nuus! Ek’s bly vir jou.

Meaning:

A: “I was promoted at work yesterday.”
B: “Impressive! Congratulations! That’s fantastic news! I’m happy for you.”

6. Intermediate Afrikaans Phrases—Etiquette Phrases for Social and Business Settings

Doing business with Afrikaners? Make sure to get your etiquette just right, and blow their socks off with your polished command of their language! Below are several intermediate phrases in Afrikaans you can use to put your best foot forward.


A Young Woman and a Man, Dressed in Business Clothes, Busy with a Meeting.

Baie dankie, ek verstaan dit nou beter. (“Thanks a lot, I understand it better now.”)

AFRIKAANSENGLISH
Bly te kenne, ek’s Carol.

Note: This is an acceptable but slightly antiquated greeting.
Meaning: “Pleased to meet you. I’m Carol.”
Literally: Pleased to know (you), I’m Carol.

Informal and semi-formal
Ek is Carol. Lekker om jou te ontmoet.Meaning: “I am Carol. Nice to meet you.”
Literally: I is Carol. Nice to you to meet.

Informal
My naam is Carol. Dis goed om jou te ontmoet.Meaning: “My name is Carol. It’s good to meet you.”
Literally: My name is Carol. It’s good to you to meet.

Formal
Gaan dit goed?Meaning: “Are you well?”
Literally: Goes it well?
Welkom hier by ons.Meaning: “Welcome!”
Literally: Welcome here with us.
Asseblief, maak jouself tuis.Meaning: “Please make yourself at home.”
Literally: Please, make yourself home.
Smaaklike ete!Meaning: “Bon appetit!”
Literally: Tasty meal!

Semi-informal and formal
Lekker eet!Meaning: “Enjoy the meal!”
Literally: Nice eat!

Informal
Dankie, ek waardeer jou moeite.Meaning: “Thanks, I appreciate your effort.”
Kan ek help met enigiets?Meaning: “Can I help with anything?”
Vra gerus as enigiets onduidelik is.Meaning: “Feel free to ask if anything is unclear.”
Literally: Ask with ease if anything unclear is.
Vra gerus as jy enigiets nodig het.Meaning: “Feel free to ask if you need anything.”
Literally: Ask freely if you anything need have.
Geen probleem, ek help graag.Meaning: “I will help, no problem.”
Literally: No problem, I help gladly.
Kan jy dit herhaal, asseblief?Meaning: “Could you repeat that, please?”
Literally: Can you it repeat, please?
Asseblief kan jy hierdie vir my verduidelik?Meaning: “Would you please explain this to me?”
Literally: Please can you here-this for me explain?
Baie dankie, ek verstaan dit nou beter.Meaning: “Thank you very much. I understand it better now.”
Literally: Many thank, I understand it now better.
Dit was baie aangenaam om jou hier te hê.Meaning: “It was very pleasant to have you here.”
Literally: It was very pleasant to you here to have.
Ek sien uit om gou van jou te hoor.Meaning: “I look forward to hearing from you soon.”
Literally: I look out around quickly of you to hear.
Voorspoedige reis!Meaning: “Have a safe / good trip!”
Literally: Prosperous journey!

7. Learn the best intermediate Afrikaans phrases for all occasions at AfrikaansPod101.com!

At AfrikaansPod101.com, we can help you understand Afrikaans easily with our hundreds of recorded videos and variety of themed vocabulary lists. With our help, your transition to the intermediate phase in Afrikaans will be smooth and enjoyable. We’ll make sure you’re able to use essential phrases correctly and speak like a native in no time!

Also, decipher Afrikaans phrases yourself with the numerous tools we make available to you upon subscription, such as the Afrikaans Key Phrase List and the Afrikaans Core 100 Word List. Also, keep our Afrikaans online dictionary closeby for easy translation! 

Sign up now!

About the author: Christa Davel is a bilingual (Afrikaans and English) writer currently living in Cape Town, South Africa. She’s been writing for InnovativeLanguage.com since 2017.

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