Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi, everyone, and welcome back to AfrikaansPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 19 - What Will You Do on Your South African Holiday? John here.
Liza: Hallo! I'm Liza.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn some conversation tactics. The conversation takes place over the phone.
Liza: It's between Liezel and Andre.
John: The speakers are family members, therefore, they will speak informal Afrikaans. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Liezel: Jammer om jou in die rede te val Andre, ek moet jou vra oor die vakansie planner.
Andre: Ek wou jou nog sê van alles. Ek en my familie gaan saam met julle kom.
Liezel: Ek het 'n vraag, ek hoop nie jy gee om dat ek vra nie. Kom jou ma saam?
Andre: Ek het gedink jy gaan my dalk vra. Nee, sy is by my sussie vir die week wat ons weg is.
Liezel: Dankie tog, jy weet ek en sy baklei baie maklik.
Andre: Dit is omdat julle so baie dieselfde is!
Liezel: In elk geval! Ek dink ons gaan 'n lekker tyd hê.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Liezel: Sorry to interrupt you, Andre. I have to ask you about your holiday plans.
Andre: I still wanted to tell you about everything. My family and I are coming with you on holiday.
Liezel: I have a question, I hope you don't mind that I am asking. Is your mom coming with you?
Andre: I thought you might ask me. No, she is at my sister’s for the week that we’re away.
Liezel: Thank goodness, you know that we fight very easily.
Andre: It is because you are so much alike.
Liezel: Anyway! I think we are going to have a great time!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Sounds like it’s a good thing that Andre’s mother isn’t going if they fight all of the time!
Liza: Yeah, that’s not a good way to spend a family holiday.
John: Is it common to go on holiday as a big family?
Liza: Yes, it is. Christmas and Easter usually see families getting together.
John: Do people go on vacation somewhere?
Liza: No, they alternate between family member’s houses, so everyone gets a turn to host.
John: What kind of things do families do?
Liza: They go to church services and eat things like melktert.
John: What’s that?
Liza: It’s a dessert. Desserts are very popular during family holidays!
John: Do people have houses big enough to host their entire families?
Liza: It can get a little hectic, with beds everywhere!
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Liza: rede [natural native speed]
John: reason
Liza: rede[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: rede [natural native speed]
John: Next, we have...
Liza: vakansie [natural native speed]
John: holiday
Liza: vakansie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: vakansie [natural native speed]
John: Then, there’s...
Liza: plan [natural native speed]
John: plan
Liza: plan[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: plan [natural native speed]
John: Next up is...
Liza: gee [natural native speed]
John: to give
Liza: gee[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: gee [natural native speed]
John: Next, we have...
Liza: sussie [natural native speed]
John: sister
Liza: sussie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: sussie [natural native speed]
John: Then, we have...
Liza: baklei [natural native speed]
John: fight
Liza: baklei[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: baklei [natural native speed]
John: Next, we have...
Liza: elk [natural native speed]
John: each
Liza: elk[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: elk [natural native speed]
John: And lastly...
Liza: maklik [natural native speed]
John: easy
Liza: maklik[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Liza: maklik [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Liza: in elk geval
John: ...meaning "in any case"
John: What can you tell us about this?
Liza: It literally means “in every failing.”
John: But we use it to mean “in any case.”
Liza: You can use this to change the topic during a conversation.
John: But be careful how you use it, because you don’t want to sound rude by changing the topic before it’s fully finished.
Liza: Yes, be especially polite in formal settings.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Liza: Sure. For example, you can say In elk geval, kom ons praat oor iets anders.
John: ...which means "In any case, let's talk about something else."
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Liza: baie maklik
John: meaning "very easily."
Liza: This meaning is literal.
John: It can be used to say that something would be very easy.
Liza: That’s right.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Liza: Sure. For example, you can say Dit is baie maklik om koek te bak.
John: .. which means "It is very easy to bake cake. "
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about conversation tactics.
John: Although it can be considered rude to do so, there are times when you need to interrupt people.
Liza: Yes, you have to be polite and smile when you do so, then it’s usually okay.
John: Liza, can you tell us some phrases we can use so that we can make sure we interrupt in a polite way?
Liza: Sure! Jammer om jou in die rede te val.
John: “Sorry to interrupt you.”
Liza: Verskoon my, ek wil iets vra.
John: “Excuse me, I want to ask something.”
Liza: Kan ek iets bysit?
John: “Can I add something?”
Liza: Kan ek gou iets sê?
John: “Can I say something quickly?”
Liza: In that last phrase, we used the word gou. This is used to mean that you’ll do something quickly.
John: Okay. Next, let’s look at some other conversation tactics. First, some phrases to help you stop someone else from continuing what they are saying.
Liza: Wag, ek moet iets sê.
John: “Wait, I need to say something.”
Liza: Wag, ek wil nie daaroor praat nie.
John: “Wait, I don’t want to talk about it.” Now, a phrase to show you want to talk about something else.
Liza: In elk geval…
John: “Anyway…” How about a couple of phrases to start off a difficult conversation?
Liza: Daar is iets belangrik wat ek vir jou moet sê.
John: “There is something serious I need to tell you.”
Liza: Ek wil vir jou iets sê.
John: “I would like to tell you something.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Liza: Baai.

5 Comments

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AfrikaansPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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AfrikaansPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 02:42 AM
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Hello Helmut


Goeie vraag. In Afrikaans gebruik ons baklei, maar dit word nie letterlik bedoel nie.


Ek en my man het baklei. - This would mean that we had a fight, not that we were literally fighting each other.


There might be better ways to say it...


Ons het woorde gehad.

We had words.


Ons kom nie oor die weg nie.

We don't get along.


Praat weer, hoop dit help.

Helmut Kumpf
Thursday at 08:40 PM
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Goeie dag,


ek dink daar is twee foute in die "dialogue" en "vocabulary". Die woord baklei sal better vertal word met engl. wrangle as die twee dames nie fight nie. En die woord biki is bietjie verkeerd geskryf, kyk na "gee" examples. Is ek reg?


Groete

Helmut

AfrikaansPod101.com Verified
Friday at 05:47 AM
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Hey Andre


Jy is reg. You are right.


There is no word for 'planner'.

Hy maak 'n plan - He makes a plan.


'Planmaker' does not sound as it's not used much but it is OK to use.

Hy is 'n regte planmaker.

He is a real planmaker. :-)

Andre
Tuesday at 03:39 PM
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Die woord 'planner' bestaan nie afsonderlik in Afrikaans nie. Die korrekte woord is 'planne'. 'n Beplanner beplan iets, of kan 'n planmaker of plannemaker wees.