Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, Eric here, and welcome back to AfrikaansPod101.com. This is Basic Bootcamp Lesson 4 - Counting from 1-100 in Afrikaans. This is the fourth in a five-part series that will help you ease your way into Afrikaans.
Pieter: Hallo! my naam is Pieter. I’m Pieter!
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn one of the essentials in Afrikaans…numbers.
Pieter: The conversation takes place at a gym, and the male speaker will do push-ups and his coach will count the numbers.
Eric: Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Pieter: Een(1),
Pieter: Twee (2),
Pieter: Drie(3),
Pieter: Vier (4),
Pieter: Vyf(5),
Pieter: Ses (6),
Pieter: Sewe(7),
Pieter: Agt (8),
Pieter: Nege (9),
Pieter: Tien(10).
Eric: Let’s hear it slowly now.
Pieter: Een(1),
Pieter: Twee (2),
Pieter: Drie(3),
Pieter: Vier (4),
Pieter: Vyf(5),
Pieter: Ses (6),
Pieter: Sewe(7),
Pieter: Agt (8),
Pieter: Nege (9),
Pieter: Tien(10).
Eric: And now with the translation.
Pieter: Een(1),
Eric: One
Pieter: Twee (2),
Eric: Two
Pieter: Drie(3),
Eric: Three
Pieter: Vier (4),
Eric: Four
Pieter: Vyf(5),
Eric: Five
Pieter: Ses (6),
Eric: Six
Pieter: Sewe(7),
Eric: Seven
Pieter: Agt (8),
Eric: Eight
Pieter: Nege (9),
Eric: Nine
Pieter: Tien(10).
Eric: Ten
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: I feel like I’ve heard a lot of those words before, somehow.
Pieter: Do you have any German friends?
Eric: Yeah I do actually. My friends Andre and Hendrik are from Germany.
Pieter: Well, they’re both Germanic languages and have a lot in common.
Eric:. How about English?
Pieter: Right, English is a Germanic language too. I’ll say a number in Afrikaans plus the three languages Dutch, German and English, and you can hear how similar they are.
Eric: Ok bring it on.
Pieter: Sewe, Zeven, Sieben, Seven
Eric: They’re a little different, but I see what you mean! Tell me one more, language master.
Pieter: Vier, Vier, Vier, Four
Eric: I see that sometimes the Afrikaans language seems to be a bit closer to German and other times it seems more like English.
Pieter: Indeed!
Eric: One of the numbers sounded very strange to me…like you had something stuck in your throat.
Pieter: Hmm let me see... That might be Agt, that’s the number “Eight.” The Afrikaans language is quite guttural but just keep practicing. I’ll say it and give you time to repeat aloud after me.
Pieter: Agt, agt (Saying it a bit over the top)
Eric: Okay. Now onto the vocab.
Vocabulary and Phrases
Eric: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we is:
Pieter: een [natural native speed]
Eric: one (1)
Pieter: een [slowly]
Pieter: een [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: twee [natural native speed]
Eric: two (2)
Pieter: twee [slowly]
Pieter: twee [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: drie [natural native speed]
Eric: three (3)
Pieter: drie [slowly]
Pieter: drie [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: vier [natural native speed]
Eric: four (4)
Pieter: vier [slowly]
Pieter: vier [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: vyf [natural native speed]
Eric: five (5)
Pieter: vyf [slowly]
Pieter: vyf [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: ses [natural native speed]
Eric: six (6)
Pieter: ses [slowly]
Pieter: ses [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: sewe [natural native speed]
Eric: seven (7)
Pieter: se-we [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pieter: sewe [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: agt [natural native speed]
Eric: eight (8)
Pieter: agt [slowly]
Pieter: agt [natural native speed]
Eric: Next:
Pieter: nege [natural native speed]
Eric: nine (9)
Pieter: ne-ge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pieter: nege [natural native speed]
Eric: Lastly
Pieter: tien [natural native speed]
Eric: ten (10)
Pieter: tien [slowly]
Pieter: tien [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Eric: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. We’ve more or less mastered the basic numbers one to ten, but how can we count above 10?
Pieter: Well, we form the numbers thirteen through nineteen simply by adding tien to the numbers 3 through 9. There are some exceptions, though. Can you pick them out?
Eric: Let’s hear them!
Pieter: elf, twaalf, dertien, veertien, vyftien, sestien, sewentien, agttien, and negentien. Eric, did you notice the exceptions”?
Eric: Well, at eleven and twelve we don’t add tien.
Pieter: That’s right. Eleven and twelve are two numbers you need to learn separately, as they don't have a logical structure like the numbers thirteen to nineteen.
Eric: I see. Could you repeat the numbers?
Pieter: Sure. Elf, twaalf, dertien, veertien, vyftien, sestien, sewentien, agttien, and negentien. And we have another exception. In the number thirteen, drie changes to der and fourteen, vier, changes to veer!
Eric: Okay, now let's take a look at the multiples of ten, which, once you know one to ten, are really easy!
Pieter: One hundred is the only one that stands out this time. It’s honderd. Other than these three, you add -tig as an ending to your number.
Eric: So “50” would be..
Pieter: vyftig. vyf is from "five" and -tig" indicates that it’s a multiple of ten. And let’s go with the multiples of ten.
Eric: Okay, let’s start from 20.
Pieter: Twintig {pause} dertig {pause} veertig {pause} vyftig {pause} sestig {pause} sewentig {pause} tagtig {pause} negentig {pause} honderd
Eric: These are the Afrikaans number from 20 to 100.
Pieter: Now, let’s make a number using these.
Eric: What’s the Afrikaans number for “Twenty-five”?
Pieter: Twenty, we remember, is twintig. Well, now all you do is put the number five in front and link them with en meaning “ and.”
Eric: So 25 is..
Pieter: Vyfentwintig. Because vyf is the number for "five." So all you have to do is say “5 and 20.”
Eric: What’s 31?
Pieter: Eenendertig. Breaking this down, it's “1 and 30.” We say this as een, which is the number "one." Then en which is the word for “and” then dertig which is the word for “thirty”.
Eric: Good to know. Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use Afrikaans numbers. When you go to a bar and order a drink, you’ll first say the number and then what you want.
Pieter: The order will be.. Number - noun - interjection.
Eric: So for example...
Pieter: Twee biere asseblief.
Eric: “Two beers please.” When you have to tell someone your age, it’ll be-
Pieter: Start with the Pronoun Ek meaning “I”, then the verb is meaning “am”, then the number vyfentwintig or ”twenty-five,” then the noun jaar meaning ”year”, and finally the adjective oud meaning “old”.
Eric: All together we have..
Pieter: Ek is vyfentwintig jaar oud.
Eric: “I’m twenty-five years old.”
Pieter: As you can see, the number is always placed in front of the noun.
Eric: If we want to say; “He has nine sisters,” what that would be?
Pieter: First, the Pronoun hy meaning “he”, then the verb het meaning “has,” then the number nege meaning “nine,” then the noun sussies meaning “sisters”. All together, we have Hy het nege sussies!
Eric: This means “He has nine sisters.”

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s it for this lesson.
Pieter: Thanks for listening, goeie dag!
Eric: And we’ll see you next time.

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