Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Hello, and welcome to AfrikaansPod101.com, where we study Afrikaans in a fun, educational format! I’m Becky, and this is Absolute Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 2, Where in South Africa Do You Live?
Chesney: Hallo, I’m Chesney.
Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn how to talk about where you come from and where you live.
Chesney: This conversation takes place on a street in Pretoria.
Becky: It’s between Anet and Mikka.
Chesney: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal Afrikaans.
Becky: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Anet: Woon jy weer in South Africa?
Mikka: Ja, ek woon weer hier. ek woon weer in Pretoria.
Anet: In die sentrum?
Mikka: Ja, en waar woon jy?
Anet: Ek woon ook in Pretoria.
Mikka: Werk jy in die sentrum?
Anet: Ja, ek werk hier. Werk jy ook in die sentrum?
Mikka: Ek werk van die huis af.
Becky: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Anet: Woon jy weer in South Africa?
Mikka: Ja, ek woon weer hier. ek woon weer in Pretoria.
Anet: In die sentrum?
Mikka: Ja, en waar woon jy?
Anet: Ek woon ook in Pretoria.
Mikka: Werk jy in die sentrum?
Anet: Ja, ek werk hier. Waar werk jy?
Mikka: Ek werk van die huis af.
Becky: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Anet: Are you living in South Africa again?
Mikka: Yes, I’m living here again. I’m living in Pretoria again.
Anet: In the center?
Mikka: Yes, and where do you live?
Anet: I also live in Pretoria.
Mikka: Do you work in the center?
Anet: Yes, I work here. Where do you work?
Mikka: I work at home.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: Okay, let’s talk a bit about South Africa as a country.
Chesney: South Africa is the southernmost country in Africa. Pretoria is the executive capital city and is located in the province of Gauteng.
Becky: More than 20% of the country’s total population lives in this province.
Chesney: Yes, Gauteng is a huge urban area. It includes two of South Africa’s largest cities, Pretoria and Johannesburg.
Becky: It sounds like it must be very busy!
Chesney: It’s very busy, and it’s also quite diverse. In fact, the most culturally diverse cities in the country are Johannesburg, Durban, and Cape Town.
Becky: What’s the South African economy like?
Chesney: South Africa has a mixed economy. It’s the second largest in Africa after Nigeria. It also has a relatively high GDP per capita compared to other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Becky: Thank you for the information! Now onto the vocab.
VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Becky: The first word we’ll see is...
Chesney: woon [natural native speed]
Becky: live
Chesney: woon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: woon [natural native speed]
Becky: Next is...
Chesney: Suid Afrika [natural native speed]
Becky: South Africa
Chesney: Suid Afrika [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: Suid Afrika [natural native speed]
Becky: And next...
Chesney: weer [natural native speed]
Becky: again
Chesney: weer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: weer [natural native speed]
Becky: And next...
Chesney: hier [natural native speed]
Becky: here
Chesney: hier [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: hier [natural native speed]
Becky: And next...
Chesney: die [natural native speed]
Becky: the
Chesney: die [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: die [natural native speed]
Becky: And next...
Chesney: sentrum [natural native speed]
Becky: center
Chesney: sentrum [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: sentrum [natural native speed]
Becky: And next...
Chesney: waar [natural native speed]
Becky: where
Chesney: waar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: waar [natural native speed]
Becky: Next is...
Chesney: werk [natural native speed]
Becky: work
Chesney: werk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: werk [natural native speed]
Becky: And last...
Chesney: huis [natural native speed]
Becky: house
Chesney: huis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney: huis [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. First is...
Chesney: die
Becky: meaning, “the.”
Chesney: There’s only one word for “the” in Afrikaans.
Becky: So you use this word in every circumstance?
Chesney: That’s right. It’s used to point out a specific thing, whether singular or plural.
Becky: Can you give us an example using this word?
Chesney: Sure, die kinders.
Becky: Which means “the children.”
Becky: Okay, what’s the next word?
Chesney: ‘n
Becky: This means “a” or “an.”
Chesney: In the previous lesson, we saw this indefinite article ’n. It’s the same as "a or an.”
Becky: So it doesn’t refer to any particular thing?
Chesney: No, it doesn’t. Listeners, note that 'n is always written with an apostrophe (').
Becky: And, it’s never capitalized - even at the beginning of a sentence. Can you give us an example using this word?
Chesney: Ek het ‘n koek geëet.
Becky: “I ate a cake.” Now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask where someone comes from and where they live.
Chesney: A sentence that can you use is Waar kom jy vandaan?
Becky: which means "Where are you from?"
Chesney: If you’re a foreigner in South Africa, you might hear that question a lot.
Becky: Yes, people are always eager to learn about new people!
Chesney: After this, you might get asked some follow-up questions.
Becky: Yes, people might be interested in where you are staying, for example.
Chesney: Yes, I think that’s a common question! That’s Waar bly julle nou.
Becky: Which is "Where are you staying now?"
Chesney: You can change this slightly. For example, in the dialogue, woon was used.
Becky: This refers to a more permanent residence.
Chesney: So, you might hear this if you’re living in South Africa.
Becky: What about tourists who are there for a shorter period of time?
Chesney: The word bly will be used instead.
Becky: Let’s hear those in sentences.
Chesney: Ek woon in Kaapstad.
Becky: “I live in Cape Town.” This refers to a long stay.
Chesney: Kaapstad means “Cape Town” in Afrikaans. For a short stay, you can say… Ek bly in Kaapstad.
Becky: It means the same but this refers to a short stay.
Chesney: Exactly. Finally, note that when asking questions you can use either bly or woon. Have some follow-up questions ready, to make sure you know what they mean.
Becky: Can you give us some examples?
Chesney: Sure. For example, you might ask Waar woon jy?
Becky: “Where do you live?”
Chesney: or Waar bly jy?
Becky: “Where are you staying?”

Outro

Becky: That just about does it for this lesson. See you next time!
Chesney: Totsiens.

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