Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Becky:
Hello, and welcome to AfrikaansPod101.com, where we study Afrikaans in a fun, educational format! I’m Becky, and this is Absolute Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 4, An Exhausting Day in South Africa.
Chesney:
Hallo, I’m Chesney.
Becky:
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about mutual friends.
Chesney:
This conversation takes place while walking to a cafe in Cape Town.
Becky:
The conversation is between Anet and Mikka.
Chesney:
The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal Afrikaans.
Becky:
Let’s listen to the conversation!

Lesson conversation

Mikka:
Sien jy Nadia en Magda so nou en dan? Waar woon hulle?
Anet:
Nadia sien ek nie baie nie. Sy woon in Johannesburg.
Mikka:
Oh, jammer! En Magda?
Anet:
Magda woon nog hier. Ek sien haar nou en dan maar nie elke dag nie.
Anet:
Sy werk ook deeltyds. Ons drink soms ‘n koppie koffie saam.
Mikka:
Is dit die koffiewinkel?
Anet:
Ja, ons is by die koffiewinkel.
Mikka:
Gelukkig, ek is moeg, is jy ook moeg?
Anet:
Kom, ons gaan naar binne.
Becky:
Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Mikka:
Sien jy Nadia en Magda so nou en dan? Waar woon hulle?
Anet:
Nadia sien ek nie baie nie. Sy woon in Johannesburg.
Mikka:
Oh, jammer! En Magda?
Anet:
Magda woon nog hier. Ek sien haar nou en dan maar nie elke dag nie.
Anet:
Sy werk ook deeltyds. Ons drink soms ‘n koppie koffie saam.
Mikka:
Is dit die koffiewinkel?
Anet:
Ja, ons is by die koffiewinkel.
Mikka:
Gelukkig, ek is moeg, is jy ook moeg?
Anet:
Kom, ons gaan naar binne.
Becky:
Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Mikka:
Do you still see Nadia and Magda occasionally? Where do they live?
Anet:
I don’t see Nadia often. She doesn’t live in Johannesburg.
Mikka:
What a pity! And Magda?
Anet:
Magda still lives here. I see her often but not every day.
Anet:
She also works part-time. We sometimes drink coffee together.
Mikka:
Is this the café?
Anet:
Yes, we’re at the café.
Mikka:
Thank god, I’m tired. Are you tired, too?
Anet:
Come on, let’s go inside.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky:
Let’s talk about the common work culture in South Africa. Do you know the regular working hours?
Chesney:
Yes. Most, if not all, businesses have their hours between 9 and 5, with the exception of different service providers.
Becky:
Yes, I read that more and more families have both parents working. But in general, men are usually the ones who work full-time, and women are more likely to stay home.
Chesney:
It also seems that some bigger companies are opting now to use flexi-hours, where the employee only has to be in the office from 9am to 3pm. In some cases, you can work Friday’s working hours into the other days and have Friday off.
Becky:
It seems like a very convenient way of organizing your time, since people can have more time for their kids.
Chesney:
Yes! Having spare time to spend with the family is very important for South Africans. That’s why it’s possible to spread the 40-hour week over four days. This way people don’t earn less, but instead they have four ten-hour days and an extra day off.
Becky:
Interesting! If many of the businesses do this, they could be very progressive. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Becky:
Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we’ll see is...
Chesney:
sien [natural native speed]
Becky:
to see
Chesney:
sien [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
sien [natural native speed]
Becky:
Next...
Chesney:
nog [natural native speed]
Becky:
still
Chesney:
nog [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
nog [natural native speed]
Becky:
Next...
Chesney:
nou en dan [natural native speed]
Becky:
occasionally
Chesney:
nou en dan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
nou en dan [natural native speed]
Becky:
Next...
Chesney:
baie [natural native speed]
Becky:
often
Chesney:
baie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
baie [natural native speed]
Becky:
Next is...
Chesney:
soms [natural native speed]
Becky:
sometimes
Chesney:
soms [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
soms [natural native speed]
Becky:
And next...
Chesney:
saam [natural native speed]
Becky:
together
Chesney:
saam [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
saam [natural native speed]
Becky:
And next...
Chesney:
moeg [natural native speed]
Becky:
tired
Chesney:
moeg [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
moeg [natural native speed]
Becky:
And next...
Chesney:
kom [natural native speed]
Becky:
come on
Chesney:
kom [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
kom [natural native speed]
Becky:
Next is...
Chesney:
gaan [natural native speed]
Becky:
to go
Chesney:
gaan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
gaan [natural native speed]
Becky:
And last...
Chesney:
binne [natural native speed]
Becky:
inside
Chesney:
binne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chesney:
binne [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Becky:
Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word we’ll look at is....
Chesney:
Waar.
Becky:
This is a question word that means "where?"
Chesney:
When you use a question word, note that the verb comes immediately after.
Becky:
This is called an open question, one which you can’t answer with a simple yes or no.
Chesney:
There are different question words, but they all follow the same pattern.
Becky:
Can you give us an example using this word?
Chesney:
Waar gaan ons heen vandag?
Becky:
“Where are we going today?”
Becky:
Okay, what’s the next word?
Chesney:
Jammer.
Becky:
This means “what a pity!” What can you tell us about this word?
Chesney:
Jammer is an Afrikaans exclamation, which is similar to "what a pity!"
Becky:
Is it usually said like that, as just one word?
Chesney:
You can also say O Jammer!
Becky:
Which would be something like “Oh, that’s too bad!”
Chesney:
Use this from time to time, and you’ll sound just like a native.
Becky:
Okay, what’s our last phrase?
Chesney:
Dankie tog.
Becky:
This means “Thank goodness.” What can you tell us about this phrase?
Chesney:
This is another Afrikaans exclamation.
Becky:
How do you use it?
Chesney:
It's used a lot like "Thank God."
Becky:
Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky:
In this lesson, you’ll learn about the negation and the verb "to be."
Chesney:
To make a sentence negative in Afrikaans, just add nie.
Becky:
This means “not.” How does it work in a sentence?
Chesney:
You place nie after the subject and verb. Then, you put in another nie at the end of the sentence.
Becky:
So I guess the double negative rule doesn’t apply in Afrikaans?
Chesney:
In fact, it would be incorrect if you didn't use the double negative.
Becky:
Can you give us some examples?
Chesney:
Of course. Ek is nie moeg nie.
Becky:
This means “I am not tired.”
Chesney:
Hy woon nie hier nie.
Becky:
“He doesn't live here.”
Chesney:
Ons werk nie hier nie.
Becky:
“We don't work here.”
Chesney:
Hopefully, everyone could hear two double nie in the sentence.
Becky:
I hope so! We should also talk about the verb “to be.” This is a very important verb in many languages.
Chesney:
We've seen it conjugated in the same way with different pronouns.
Becky:
Could you refresh our memories?
Chesney:
Gladly. Ek is.
Becky:
This is “I am.”
Chesney:
Jy is.
Becky:
This is “you are.”
Chesney:
dit is.
Becky:
“It is.” What about plural forms?
Chesney:
The plural forms are exactly the same as the singular forms.
Becky:
It seems to me that verbs in Afrikaans are easier than in English.
Chesney:
I think so too, because they do not change. The only difference is adding het, ge, and sal to indicate the three tenses.
Becky:
And, there are only three tenses, too!

Outro

Becky:
That just about does it for this lesson. See you next time!
Chesney:
Totsiens.

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